Homily: Ascension Of The Lord by Rev. Fr. Allen Baclor Abadines

ascension pater

GOSPEL REFLECTION: ASCENSION OF THE LORD
WORLD COMMUNICATIONS DAY
by Rev. Fr. Allen Baclor Abadines
*

GOSPEL: MARK 16:15-20
Jesus said to his disciples:
“Go into the whole world
and proclaim the gospel to every creature.
Whoever believes and is baptized will be saved;
whoever does not believe will be condemned.
These signs will accompany those who believe:
in my name, they will drive out demons,
they will speak new languages.
They will pick up serpents with their hands,
and if they drink any deadly thing, it will not harm them.
They will lay hands on the sick, and they will recover.”

So then the Lord Jesus, after he spoke to them,
was taken up into heaven
and took his seat at the right hand of God.
But they went forth and preached everywhere,
while the Lord worked with them
and confirmed the word through accompanying signs.
________________________

REFLECTION:

Here in Canada, we celebrate the Solemnity of the Ascension of the Lord this Sunday. Traditionally, the observance of the Ascension of the Lord is on Thursday, the 40th day after Easter. However, for pastoral reasons, the Church has obtained permission from the Vatican to move its observance on Sunday 43 days after Easter, for some countries like Canada. It is a Sunday before Pentecost. To celebrate it on Sunday actually, helps set the mood for our reflection in preparation for Pentecost.

Certainly, by its name itself, what comes to our mind as we reflect on this Sunday’s Liturgy is the fact that our Lord Jesus was lifted up to heaven. It must be a wonderful sightseeing Jesus ascended to heaven. His disciples were indeed so privilege having witnessed such spectacular event. But our reflection should not only be focused on Jesus’ leaving the earthly presence.

The observance of the Ascension of the Lord has a more profound meaning than just reflecting on the fact that Jesus ascended into heaven. In last Sunday’s Gospel text, the scene was set during the Last Supper wherein Jesus was saying his so-called Farewell Discourse. There was a tinge of sadness in Jesus’ words since he was actually saying goodbye to his apostles. He knew that his hour has come. He was fully aware of his impending death and suffering. But instead of thinking about himself, he was thinking of his apostles. He was giving them the strength that they may be able to bear the imminent suffering. Jesus offered them the gift of peace. He said let your hearts not be troubled. And he promised them that he would send an Advocate that would remind them of all that he has done. Jesus knew that the hour will come for him to depart from this world and go to the Father. His earthly mission is complete. This is the time for him to go back to the Father. And therefore today we celebrate this event of the Ascension. But what is it’s significance and how it is relevant to us today?

First, Ascension may mean the end of Jesus’ earthly mission. But it doesn’t mean just an end but rather it means more of a beginning. It is the beginning of the new chapter of the saving work which Jesus began. Now, it’s time for the apostles to continue this work and pass it on eventually to the Church and its members. In the first reading, Acts 1:8, Jesus admonished his disciples to continue his mission – “and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.”

Second, Ascension means to glorify the Son of God. Jesus’ mission is fulfilled. The Son of God is triumphant in the offering of his life on the cross. Like to a Lamb, Jesus willingly sacrifices his life for the salvation of the world. Now is the time to give back his heavenly glory. The Father is well pleased and He exalted Jesus. This is best described in the second reading from the letter to the Ephesians, “God put this power to work in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly places…”

Third, now that Jesus is exalted by the Father, it allows him to prepare a place for us. John 14:2, “In my Father’s house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you.”

As we reflect on the meaning of the Ascension of the Lord, the question now is – how is this relevant to us today?

First, It means that as followers and as children of God, our task now is to continue the mission of spreading the good news of the Kingdom of God. The mission is huge. There are times that we may feel unworthy. We should not worry – ‘let your hearts not be troubled.’ We only have to put our complete trust in Jesus. Jesus may not be with us physically but he never leave us orphans. He wants us to be able to carry this mission out and so he promised – “Behold, I am with you always until the end of the age.” He sent the Holy Spirit to empower us so that we be credible witnesses to the Gospel.

Second, the Ascension of the Lord tells us that we are but pilgrims here on earth and our final destination is heaven. After doing the task of spreading the Good News and that we remain faithful until the end, then heaven is our reward. Jesus wants us to succeed. He wants to gather his flock once again in his Kingdom.

The Apostles were here spreading the Good News of our Salvation 2000 years ago. The mission has been passed on to us. Now it is our turn to do the same. It is indeed a great responsibility. But let us do our part with great faith and great love. But do not forget to always ask the Holy Spirit for guidance, inspiration, and strength. Be bold…be courageous in making the Love of Jesus known throughout the whole world.

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Homily: Fourth Sunday of Easter (B) by Rev. Fr. Allen Baclor Abadines

Good Shepherd pater

GOSPEL REFLECTION
Fourth Sunday of Easter (B)
World Day of Prayer for Vocations
Sunday, 22nd April 2018
by Rev. Fr. Allen Baclor Abadines

GOSPEL: John 10:11-18

Jesus said: “I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. The hired hand, who is not the shepherd and does not own the sheep, sees the wolf coming and leaves the sheep and runs away- and the wolf snatches them and scatters them. The hired hand runs away because a hired hand does not care for the sheep.
“I am the good shepherd. I know my own and my own know me, just as the Father knows me and I know the Father. And I lay down my life for the sheep. I have other sheep that do not belong to this fold. I must bring them also, and they will listen to my voice. So there will be one flock, one shepherd.
“For this reason, the Father loves me, because I lay down my life in order to take it up again. No one takes it from me, but I lay it down of my own accord. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it up again. I have received this command from the Father.”
*
The Gospel of the Lord. Praise to you, Lord Jesus Christ.

REFLECTION:
Today we celebrate Good Shepherd Sunday. Every year, on the Fourth Sunday of Easter, the Church invites us to reflect on this beautiful Jesus’ description of himself as the Good Shepherd. In the Scripture, Jesus was given titles like the Son of God, Lord, Teacher, Messiah, and King. But it was through Jesus’ words that we learned this image of him as the Good Shepherd. In today’s Gospel text, our Lord Jesus said, “I am the good shepherd.” This description of our Lord Jesus about himself is most appealing to many of us as it is indeed consoling. It conveys Jesus’ tenderness, his compassion, and care, his concern and love for his flock. Such an image is reassuring for us. In this time and season, this is what we need to hear – that Jesus is with us, supporting and guiding us on our journey through life. When life is beset with problems and or personal challenges occur this image of Jesus the Good Shepherd reassures and consoles us. It tells us that God will never abandon us, that we are not alone in our struggles and that Jesus is supporting and holding us up.
This is the same reason why that old story – Footprints in the Sand- became very popular. People see Jesus as their refuge. When we feel so desolate and alone, Footprints in the Sand is something that we should contemplate upon. For during those moments of trials that Jesus carries us in his arms like a good shepherd.
“I am the good shepherd. A good shepherd lays down his life for his sheep.”
When we are feeling sad and low, think of the love of Jesus. He loves us unconditionally not because we are worthy of it nor we have a right to that love. But simply because Jesus is love personified. St. Paul puts it beautifully, he said to the Romans, “While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” When Jesus said, “I am the good shepherd and I am ready to lay down my life for my sheep.” He really did it. Christ accepted death willingly and voluntarily, i.e. that we might be saved. Christ died for us. John 15:13 “Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.” Therefore, when Christ gave us this image of a Good Shepherd, he wanted to impart to us that message of a perfect love of the Son of God. Despite our unworthiness and sinfulness, He loved us first that He might restore us our identity as children of God and that we too might become imitators of His love.
Therefore, the celebration of Good Shepherd Sunday is teaching us important lessons in life.
First, Just as Jesus is a good shepherd to us, we, too, are expected to be good shepherds. True shepherding is a life of total self-giving. In a way, we are all shepherds. As pastor of our Church, I am the shepherd of this flock. I am, therefore expected to be a good shepherd. I am expected to live a good and holy life. Jesus, the good shepherd, should be reflected in my dealing with people and in my personal life. If not then I am not being true to my calling.
Parents, you are shepherds in your own home. Therefore, you are expected to be good and loving parents. You are expected to set good examples for your children. You are expected to guide and lead the children to the truth and to the faith.
This reminds me of a story as related by Bro. Andrew Maria: A young boy caught stealing is brought before a judge, who cross-examines him.”How old are you?” the judge asks him. “Ten years old.” “Who taught you to steal?” “My Father.” Upon hearing this, the judge orders the arrest of the father and sets the boy free.
“Your honor, why are you sending me to jail for my son’s crime?” asks the father.
The judge answers unequivocally, “One who teaches another to commit a crime is a worse criminal.”
Second, The celebration of Good Shepherd Sunday is teaching us to be imitators of Jesus service, sacrifice, and love. Being loved by Christ is the ground of becoming loving. Our awareness that we are loved despite our flaws and weaknesses should be the reason for us to be more loving, more accepting and forgiving.

HOMILY: Second Sunday Of Easter Divine Mercy Sunday by Rev. Fr. Allen Baclor Abadines

Divine Mercy - Pater

 

GOSPEL REFLECTION: 2nd SUNDAY OF EASTER
DIVINE MERCY SUNDAY
by Rev. Fr. Allen Baclor Abadines
*

GOSPEL: JOHN 20:19-31

On the evening of the first day of the week, when the doors were locked, where the disciples were, for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood in their midst and said to them, “Peace be with you.” When he had said this, he showed them his hands and his side.
The disciples rejoiced when they saw the Lord. Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, so I send you.” And when he had said this, he breathed on them and said to them, “Receive the Holy Spirit. Whose sins you forgive are forgiven them, and whose sins you retain are retained.”

Thomas, called Didymus, one of the Twelve, was not with them when Jesus came. So the other disciples said to him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands and put my finger into the nail marks and put my hand into his side, I will not believe.”
Now a week later his disciples were again inside and Thomas was with them. Jesus came, although the doors were locked, and stood in their midst and said, “Peace be with you.” Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here and see my hands, and bring your hand and put on my side, and do not be unbelieving, but believe.”
Thomas answered and said to him, “My Lord and my God!” Jesus said to him, “Have you come to believe because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and have believed.”

Now, Jesus did many other signs in the presence of his disciples that are not written in this book. But these are written that you may come to believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God and that through this belief you may have life in his name.

*
The Gospel of the Lord./ Praise to you, Lord Jesus Christ.
*

—————————————————–

REFLECTION:

Today we celebrate Second Sunday of Easter. On the Second Sunday of Easter, we continue our reflection on the risen Christ. But this is also a day, in particular, that we are being invited to reflect on the immensity of God’s mercy and love as we also celebrate Divine Mercy Sunday. When we say Divine Mercy, we mean to say it’s God’s infinite mercy. His mercy, love, and forgiveness are greater than sin, suffering, and death. It means our salvation and life eternal. And it means Christ’s victory as well as our own. This Sunday’s Gospel text helps us to understand the reality in the mystery of this Divine Mercy. It is clearly stated in today’s Gospel message. Divine forgiveness, peace, mercy, and love are the keywords underlying the message of John.

The Gospel relates to us that our Lord Jesus appears before the apostles. Very noticeable in this particular text is the image of Jesus who is so quick to assure his disciples of his peace and forgiveness. I could only imagine how those disciples must have felt at that time. They confined themselves in a room out of fear, desperation, and shame. One of them, Judas betrayed our Lord for thirty pieces of silver and it is easy to condemn him for his action but on that most trying moments in the life of our Lord, the rest of the apostles did not do too well either. They abandoned our Lord Jesus in times when he needed them most. We could even recall how Peter professed that he would lay down his life for Jesus. But Jesus knew that he would even deny him three times when he was put to the test. It was only John the beloved who was seen all the way to Calvary. And so the disciples knew that they were no better than Judas who betrayed our Lord.

Against this background of doubts and lacking faith, later on, the disciples manifested deep expression of faith. They became courageous and bold. They continued the mission of Christ of spreading the Good News of God’s Kingdom. Eventually, except for John they suffered the same fate as their Master. And so on this encounter of the risen Christ, Jesus manifested that he perfectly understood how his disciples must have felt at that time. He knew the guilt and the shame the disciples were keeping in their hearts. It was in this situation that our Lord Jesus assured them of the gift of Peace. Several times the word “Peace” was mentioned in the Gospel. The nature of “Shalom” or “Peace” of Christ in its purest sense means joy, the tranquility of the soul and in its more profound sense, it means healing and reconciliation. Just like what St. Paul tells us in his letter to the Colossians (1:20-22)
“20 and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross.
21 And you, who once were alienated and hostile in mind, doing evil deeds, 22 he has now reconciled in his body of flesh by his death, in order to present you holy and blameless and above reproach before him,”

Jesus himself is the source and author of Peace. “Peace I give to you, not as the world gives; do I give to you.” The Peace of Christ means more than offering reconciliation, it is salvific, it gives life and it brings us back our dignity as Children of God.

As we continue to reflect on the Risen Christ and the Divine Mercy, we are being invited to always desire and ask for God’s mercy, forgiveness, and love. Divine Mercy Sunday also invites us to put our complete trust in Jesus and to imitate his mercy in our lives.

Luke 6:36 “Be merciful, just as your Father is merciful.”
“Jesus, I trust in you!”

Homily: Corpus Christi (A) The Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ by Rev. Fr. Allen Baclor Abadines

Corpus Christi4

 

GOSPEL REFLECTION: Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ (A) CORPUS CHRISTI
by Rev. Fr. Allen Baclor Abadines
*

GOSPEL: JOHN 6:51-59

Jesus said to the people: “I am the living bread that came down from heaven. Whoever eats this bread will live forever. This bread is my flesh, which I will give for the life of the world.”
The people then disputed among themselves, saying, “How can this man give us his flesh to eat?”

Jesus said to them, “Very truly I tell you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise them up at the last day. For my flesh is real food and my blood is real drink. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood remains in me, and I in them.

“Just as the living Father sent me and I live because of the Father, so the one who feeds on me will live because of me. This is the bread that came down from heaven. Your ancestors ate manna and died, but whoever feeds on this bread will live forever.”

He said this while teaching in the synagogue in Capernaum.
*
The Gospel Of The Lord/ Praise to You, Lord Jesus Christ
*
_____________________________________________

REFLECTION:

It is sad to know that nowadays some families rarely eat together anymore. Eating together as a family, for me, is an important aspect of family life. This is one particular family activity that strengthens family bonds. It is an opportunity for family members to exchange pleasantries and to some extent get to know each other so well. A healthy conversation among family members is essential to building up of a close family relationship. In the old days, when life and technologies were much simpler, families spent more time together. Members worked, ate, and slept together. But nowadays, even if they find time together at one table, they seemed to be busy doing their own thing. In that case, the chance to get to know each other intimately is destroyed. We need to put back a culture of strong family ties.Where we see parents talking to their children, Children listening to their parents. And siblings sharing jokes, laughter, and stories. And at the dinner table is the best place to start. I really miss those days when we share moments in one table as a family.It is the best place where families could create special memories together. We say the grace together. We share our experiences, some jokes, stories and some of our dreams and aspirations. We create sweet moments that we’ll treasure the rest of our lives.

Probably this is the reason why our Lord Jesus instituted the Eucharist in a form of a meal. Jesus wants us to gather at the Church as a community and as one family.Matthew 18:20 “For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in their midst.” Gathering therefore at a Church for our worship is indeed in God’s desire for us. Exodus 20:8 “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy.” There should be no compromise. Sometimes you hear people say,”Why should I go to Church when I see people who are sinners too?” Well, that is exactly the reason why there is a need for us to come to Church i.e. because we are all sinners. We need God’s grace and forgiveness. We also need one another in our spiritual journey. We need the support of the community in our spiritual life. While we are taking care of our own spirituality, we are also building up a Christian community. A community united in the love of Christ. Yes, we are an imperfect community for we are composed of imperfect people. But we go hand in hand as a community of believers towards perfection.This leads me to believe that those people who do not go to Church are only making excuses. For, in the end, the only reason I see is a sloth or perhaps lack or absence of faith. When one is convinced about the real presence of Jesus in the Eucharist, by all means, he will always find time to receive Communion as often as he could. The first time I learned about the real presence of Jesus in the bread, I fell in love instantly in the Eucharist. And I said to myself, “From now on I will never fail to receive Jesus in the Eucharist every week.” I kept that promise. It is one of the reasons why I decided to become a priest.

It is such a profound wisdom why Jesus presented to us himself as a Bread of Life. This Sunday, we are confronted with a Gospel text that deals with the Living Bread and the idea of partaking of it. John 6:51,, “I am the living bread that came down from heaven. Whoever eats of this bread will live forever, and the bread that I will give for the life of the world is my flesh.”
In today’s Gospel, we see Jesus’ listeners having difficulty in accepting Jesus’ teaching. They argued with one another, “How can this man give us his flesh to eat?” It was not easy for them to comprehend. Thus they abandoned our Lord Jesus saying “it was a hard teaching.” To this date, we are confronted with the same issue. There are people who expressed their doubts in believing in the presence of Jesus in the Eucharist. It is not surprising that even among Catholics, there are those who are struggling to accept this teaching. But we could have the same argument presented when we explain the mystery of the Trinity. “It is not a puzzle to be solved, but a mystery to be lived.” Receiving Jesus in the Eucharist daily will help us grow in our faith and will help us understand the mystery of his presence in the Eucharist. To a man, it may be impossible. But to God everything is possible. He created the universe by just mere word, how can he not make himself present in every Sacred Host.

At the Last Supper, Jesus took the bread, blessed it and said, “This is my body.” Then he took the chalice, gave it to his disciples and said, “This is my blood.” Then he asked us to do this in “Remembrance of Me.” Every time, we celebrate the Mass and we receive Jesus in the Eucharist we celebrate God’s saving act and his love for us. It is a remembrance of God’s eternal love for mankind.

HOMILY: Solemnity Of The Most Holy Trinity (A) by Rev.Fr. Allen Baclor Abadines

TRINITY0

GOSPEL REFLECTION: SOLEMNITY OF THE MOST HOLY TRINITY (A)
by Rev. Fr. Allen Baclor Abadines
*

GOSPEL: JOHN 3:16-18

God so loved the world that he gave his only Son,
so that everyone who believes in him might not perish
but might have eternal life.
For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world,
but that the world might be saved through him.
Whoever believes in him will not be condemned,
but whoever does not believe has already been condemned,
because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God.
*
____________________________________________

REFLECTION:

God wants to establish a personal and intimate relationship with us. This is the reason why he revealed His very nature with us. We do not normally reveal ourselves to a someone we do not personally know. And so when God reveals Himself to us as Trinity, it is a manifestation of God’s desire to enter into a relationship with all of the humanity. That is good news …we have a relationship with God. God calls us His own. Unworthy as we are, the fact still remains i.e. we are loved! Now we could clearly understand why Jesus wants us to call his Father as our Father too. In the Lord’s Prayer Jesus taught us to call God as our Father.

When I reflect on the Trinity, what comes to my mind is a perfect relationship. A relationship between the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit. All equal, undivided in unity.God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit are co-equal, co-eternal, three distinct persons, yet one God.

So today, the Church invites us to contemplate on the mystery of the Trinity. Today’s Solemnity teaches us that we have but one God with Three Divine persons – The Father, The Son, and The Holy Spirit.

Not only a few but a lot of people are struggling to accept this teaching of the Church. St. Augustine spent so much in his lifetime unraveling the mystery of the Trinity only to get to the conclusion in the end that we will never get to the bottom of it. It is a mystery! And when we say a mystery, it means that one can never completely comprehend its very nature. Somebody puts it beautifully: the Trinity is “not a problem to be solved but a mystery to be lived.” It doesn’t mean however that we will remain totally oblivion of it. In order for us to somehow understand the mystery is to experience it in our lives. Experience the Trinitarian love in our lives. It should be a way of life to us. God should be the ultimate end of man’s journey. St. Augustine says that Man is by nature restless and only in God where a man can find real rest.

The word Trinity is a combination of the Latin words “Trinus” meaning Three and “Unus” meaning One.Nowhere in the Scriptures where you could find the word, Trinity. So how did we know that God is Trinity? Our Lord Jesus revealed to us the Trinitarian nature of God.
For instance, when the teacher of the law approached Jesus and asked him this question: Of all the Commandments which is the greatest: Jesus replied, “Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one.” (Mark 12:28). In the Gospel of John 10:30, Jesus said, “I and the Father are one.” In John 14:9 Philip said to Jesus, “Lord, show us the Father, and that will be enough for us.” But Jesus replied:“Have I been with you so long, and you still do not know me, Philip? Whoever has seen me has seen the Father. How can you say, ‘Show us the Father’?” It was at the baptism of the Lord when the Trinity is clearly revealed. The heavens opened and the Father spoke: “This is my beloved Son with whom I am well pleased’ And the Holy Spirit descended to our Lord Jesus in a form of a dove. That was a perfect revelation of the Trinity.

The question is that: If the Doctrine of the Trinity is beyond human comprehension, how then is it relevant to us today? St. Augustine says that ‘anyone who denies the Trinity loses his salvation.’ At the very heart of our Christian faith is our profession of our belief in the Trinity. God reveals Himself to us in order to save us. Thus, it is summarized in today’s Gospel Text:

“God so loved the world that he gave his only Son,
so that everyone who believes in him might not perish
but might have eternal life.”

Homily: Ascension of The Lord (A) by Rev. Fr. Allen Baclor Abadines

 

ascension 6

 

GOSPEL REFLECTION: ASCENSION OF THE LORD (A)
by Rev. Fr. Allen Baclor Abadines

*
GOSPEL: MATTHEW 28:16-20
The eleven disciples went to Galilee,
to the mountain to which Jesus had ordered them.
When they saw him, they worshiped, but they doubted.

Then Jesus approached and said to them,
“All power in heaven and on earth has been given to me.
Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations,
baptizing them in the name of the Father,
and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit,
teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you.
And behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age.”
*
______________________________

REFLECTION:

Here in Canada, we celebrate the Solemnity of the Ascension of the Lord this Sunday. Traditionally, the observance of the Ascension of the Lord is on Thursday, the 40th day after Easter.However, for pastoral reasons, the Church has obtained permission from Vatican to move its observance on Sunday 43 days after Easter, for some countries like Canada. It is a Sunday before Pentecost.To celebrate it on Sunday actually, helps set the mood for our reflection in preparation for Pentecost.

Certainly, by its name itself, what comes to our mind as we reflect on this Sunday’s Liturgy is the fact that our Lord Jesus was lifted up to heaven.It must be a wonderful sight seeing Jesus ascended to heaven. His disciples were indeed so privilege having witnessed such spectacular event. But our reflection should not only be focused on Jesus’ leaving the earthly presence.

The observance of the Ascension of the Lord has a more profound meaning than just reflecting on the fact that Jesus ascended to heaven. In last Sunday’s Gospel text, the scene was set during the Last Supper wherein Jesus was saying his so-called Farewell Discourse. There was a tinge of sadness in Jesus’ words since he was actually saying goodbye to his apostles. He knew that his hour has come. He was fully aware of his impending death and suffering. But instead of thinking about himself, he was thinking of his apostles. He was giving them the strength that they may be able to bear the imminent suffering. Jesus offered them the gift of peace. He said let your hearts not be troubled. And he promised them that he would send an Advocate that would remind them of all that he has done. Jesus knew that the hour will come for him to depart from this world and go to the Father. His earthly mission is complete. This is the time for him to go back to the Father.And therefore today we celebrate this event of the Ascension. But what is it’s significance and how it is relevant to us today?

First, Ascension may mean the end of Jesus’ earthly mission. But it doesn’t mean just an end but rather it means more of a beginning. It is the beginning of the new chapter of the saving work which Jesus began. Now, it’s time for the apostles to continue this work and pass it on eventually to the Church and its members. In the first reading, Acts 1:8, Jesus admonished his disciples to continue his mission – “and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.”

Second, Ascension means to glorify the Son of God. Jesus’ mission is fulfilled. The Son of God is triumphant in his offering of his life on the cross. Like to a Lamb, Jesus willingly sacrifices his life for the salvation of the world. Now is the time to give back his heavenly glory. The Father is well pleased and He exalted Jesus. This is best described in the second reading from the letter to the Ephesians, “God put this power to work in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly places…”

Third, now that Jesus is exalted by the Father, it allows him to prepare a place for us. John 14:2, “In my Father’s house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you.”

As we reflect on the meaning of the Ascension of the Lord, the question now is – how is this relevant to us today?

First, It means that as followers and as children of God, our task now is to continue the mission of spreading the good news of the Kingdom of God. The mission is huge. There are times that we may feel unworthy. We should not worry – ‘let your hearts not be troubled.’ We only have to put our complete trust in Jesus. Jesus may not be with us physically but he never leave us orphans. He wants us to be able to carry this mission out and so he promised – “Behold, I am with you always until the end of the age.” He sent the Holy Spirit to empower us so that we be credible witnesses to the Gospel.

Second, the Ascension of the Lord tells us that we are but pilgrims here on earth and our final destination is heaven. After doing the task of spreading the Good News and that we remain faithful until the end, then heaven is our reward. Jesus wants us to succeed. He wants to gather his flock once again in his Kingdom.

The Apostles were here spreading the Good News of our Salvation 2000 years ago. The mission has been passed on to us. Now it is our turn to do the same. It is indeed a great responsibility. But let us do our part with great faith and great love. But do not forget to always ask the Holy Spirit for guidance, inspiration, and strength. Be bold…be courageous in making the Love of Jesus known throughout the whole world.

Homily: Sixth Sunday Of Easter (A) by Pater Allen Baclor Abadines

6th easter

 

GOSPEL REFLECTION: SIXTH SUNDAY OF EASTER (A)
by Rev. Fr. Allen Baclor Abadines
*GOSPEL: JOHN 14:15-21Jesus said to his disciples:
“If you love me, you will keep my commandments.
And I will ask the Father,
and he will give you another Advocate to be with you always,
the Spirit of truth, whom the world cannot accept,
because it neither sees nor knows him.

But you know him because he remains with you,
and will be in you.
I will not leave you orphans; I will come to you.
In a little while the world will no longer see me,
but you will see me because I live and you will live.

On that day you will realize that I am in my Father
and you are in me and I in you.
Whoever has my commandments and observes them
is the one who loves me.

And whoever loves me will be loved by my Father,
and I will love him and reveal myself to him.”
*
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REFLECTION:

In a Sunday school, the Parish priest was teaching the children about Jesus. He was telling them that Jesus is a loving father. He told them about the so many good qualities of Jesus – like his obedience to the Father, his compassion to the poor, to the sick and needy people and the sacrifice he made for mankind. As he was explaining to them about Jesus, suddenly there was one little boy, his name was Johnny, who said to the pastor: “Father, you are a lot like Jesus.” And the priest gave little Johnny the sweetest smile for to him that was the most wonderful compliment he has ever heard his entire life i.e. to be likened to Jesus.

Our goal here on earth is to imitate Jesus in our lives. We should be an “Alter Christus” or “another Christ.” Imitate Jesus in everything we do and in everyone we encounter. Jesus should always be our model in humility, in generosity, in service, in compassion, in forgiveness, and in love. This is how we could prove our love of him. “If you love me, you will keep my commandments.” We are commanded to love as Jesus loves. Well, it’s not gonna be easy so we need help.We need inspiration and strength to go on. And this is what Jesus promised us – “And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Advocate to be with you always.” Jesus promised us to send the Holy Spirit to be our guide.

We now celebrate the sixth Sunday of Easter.We are near the conclusion of our Easter celebration, The Church continue to invite us to reflect on the Gospel of John. On the sixth Sunday of Easter, the Gospel text is still part of the Farewell discourse of Jesus. Indeed, it is appropriate so that we could prepare now for our reflection on the Ascension Sunday and the Pentecost. It talks about Jesus’ departure as well as the promise of the coming of the Holy Spirit.

Last Sunday, in my homily, I said it is not good for us to be alone. There is a need for us to belong to something and to someone. We need a place to stay, we need a home and we need a family.Last Sunday, Jesus promised to prepare a place for us. But while we wait for his return to take us for himself, he is sending us another advocate and that is the Holy Spirit or a Paraclete.

Paraclete comes from the Greek word Parakletos, it refers to “One who consoles or comforts, one who encourages or uplifts and one who intercedes on our behalf.” This is what the Holy Spirit does to us, He encourages, He consoles and He comforts us. He gives us the strength, protection, and care, He refreshes and guides us. Which means that in our journey to our going home to the Father, we are not alone. Jesus wants us to succeed.”I will not leave you orphans.” But there is something he wants us to do – i.e. to keep his commandments.”Whoever has my commandments and observes them is the one who loves me.
And whoever loves me will be loved by my Father,
and I will love him and reveal myself to him.” What are Jesus’ commands? Very clearly in the Scriptures, it is a commandment to Love.

When we were young, our parents used to give us so many restrictions and rules. Most kids didn’t like that. There are times that those rules didn’t really make sense. They rebelled, they protested and they disobeyed. Only when they became adults that they understood that those rules and restrictions were made because they are loved. Parents gave them those rules because they care and because they are for their own good. And so Jesus said, “If you love me, you will keep my commandment.” That’s the only way we can prove our love of God.

Maybe it sounds simple. But to love truly and sincerely is never easy. Much more to love as Jesus loves. Jesus commanded us to love even the unlovable, even people who do not deserve our love. He even commanded us to love our enemies. And to love till it hurts. By us alone, things may not be possible. But with the help of the Holy Spirit, our strength, inspiration, and guide-what seem to be impossible would be possible. Then loving would not be a burden but a way of life.